• Karyl Eckerle

First Impressions: Is Your Silent Message Resonating?


One two, three, four, five, six, seven.


That's it’s.


That's the amount of time you have to make a great first impression.


Now to be fair, there are studies that support anywhere from a "blink of an eye" to 30 seconds. But, I think you get the point...it's QUICK!


And as the adage goes, you only have one chance to make a good first impression.


So what do you do?


Well, the first thing that you do is learn how to show up - show up in the manner that is reflective of how you feel about yourself.


The onus of communication is really on us as a communicator, and it's up to us to give signals to people that give them a hint of who we are, how we think, what we do, what it's like to work with us.


Within the “blink of an eye” your audience is making judgment calls about who you are and what you're all about.

It’s up to you to give them clues - visual clues through how you physically present yourself - as to what you're all about and who you are.


Not willing to share visual clues? Don’t be surprised when you’re misinterpreted.




You’re the star of your own movie. How have you cast yourself?

When characters are created and created for movies, there's a lot of thought and intention that goes into how to portray the physical presence of each character. From how they dress to hair styles to overall grooming to mannerisms. These details allow the viewer to form a quick understanding of the characters. Of course characters, just like us, are complex. But their physical presence (their outer shell) gives us a place to begin to understand who they are.


Take it one step further and think about the importance of character description in books. A simple description of the character's appearance gives you a visual that helps you understand who they are.


“She appeared in a flowing, white dress, colorful beaded jewelry and long curled hair.”


versus:


“She appeared in a tan business suit, a simple monogrammed necklace, and with her hair pulled back off her face."


Two simple descriptions - two different feelings and interpretations of who and what this woman is all about.


Take it yet another step further: one is an artist, the other an attorney. Who's who? Each person will make an assumption based on their own experiences and expectations. If you find out that you have it backwards, you experience confusion. Confusion can lead to lack of confidence and maybe even distrust. Which means moving forward with you "perfect prospect" may come to a screeching halt.

First impressions often happen in silence. Your visible credibility is vitally important to what happens next.

Are you believable? Are you credible? Are you trustworthy?




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More often than not, people have made a decision about who we are and what we're all about before we have even said "hello."


Which brings us back to the importance of giving others cues.


It's imperative to give others visual cues of who we are and what to expect from us. First impressions matter. They matter to your confidence, the confidence other have in you, and to your bottom line


Take control your silent narrative so that their first impression will be in line with how you want to be seen, heard and remembered.

Your silent message is a major part of how you communicate with others.


It' not just what you say or write, but how you present yourself.


After all…


Your image IS your business®


Are you ready to work with a professional image and personal branding strategist to make a bigger IMPACT with your prospects and clients? Not sure where to start? Reach out to Michigan personal branding and image expert, Karyl Eckerle, by scheduling a complimentary discovery call.

Are you looking for more tips to increase your Image Impact™?

"This tiny tip book packs a big punch. Karyl's distilled her best material and curated it into bite-sized brilliance. If you're ready to make an impact in your career, grab a copy of Karyl's book" - Amelia "Mimi" Brown, Motivational Speaker


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